USDA Mortgages: Take Advantage of These Low-Rate Mortgage Loans to Buy a New Home

USDA Mortgages: Take Advantage of These Low-rate Mortgage Loans to Buy a New HomeAre you thinking about buying a home in a rural or suburban area? If so, you’ll want to take a look at the United States Department of Agriculture’s mortgage programs as you may qualify for them.

In today’s blog post we’ll introduce the USDA Rural Development Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program, explain the benefits of this mortgage program and how to determine if you qualify.

What is a USDA Mortgage Loan?

The USDA mortgage program is one of a number of programs in which the federal government will guarantee a mortgage loan as long as the recipient meets certain criteria. The intent of this program is to provide a boost to residents of rural or suburban areas who are struggling to obtain a traditional mortgage.

USDA mortgage loans are an ideal solution for those who are looking for 15 or 30-year amortization periods as they tend to have lower interest rates than mortgages offered by banks and other lenders.

USDA Mortgage Loan Benefits

There are numerous benefits to USDA mortgages that make this an enticing option compared to a mortgage from a traditional lender. As these loans offer full 100 percent financing you won’t have to place a large down payment when buying the home. The USDA offers very competitive 15 and 30-year fixed interest rates, something you won’t find from many banks or other mortgage lenders.There’s also no maximum home purchase price with USDA mortgages, however note that you’ll still be limited by your risk and your ability to manage the monthly mortgage payment.

USDA Mortgage Loan Requirements

The USDA mortgage program is open to all homebuyers that meet a number of initial requirements. The home you intend to purchase has to be located in a rural area (as determined by the USDA) and it cannot be a vacation home or investment property. As with any mortgage, you’ll need a relatively clean credit history. Finally, note that your annual income will also be assessed and you’ll need to prove that you’re within 115 percent of the region’s median income.

As you can see, the USDA Rural Development Mortgage program can be an excellent option if you’re planning on buying a home in a rural or suburban area. Contact your local mortgage advisor today and they can explain the USDA home loan program and answer any questions that you might have.

FOMC Minutes: Economy Growing, Housing Lags

FOMC Minutes Economy Growing Housing LagsMinutes of the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting held October 28 and 29 were released Wednesday. The report suggests that the U.S. economy continues to improve, although the annual inflation rate remains near 1.50 percent and short of the committee’s goal of 2.00 percent. Falling crude oil prices were cited as a cause of faltering inflation rates. The minutes indicated that FOMC members expect inflation to remain below the 2.00 percent benchmark for the next year or so.

The minutes did not reveal an exact date for raising the target federal funds rate, which is currently 0.00 to 0.250 percent, but analysts expect a rate change in mid-to-late 2015. One committee member said that the Fed should commit to keeping the target federal funds rate at its present level until inflation reaches the Fed’s goal of 2.00 percent.

Job Markets Improve, Mortgage Rates Fall

FOMC members said that labor markets had improved “somewhat further.” The minutes noted that the national unemployment rate had declined to 5.90 percent in September, which was lower than the FOMC goal of 6.50 percent for national unemployment. While this was good news, FOMC discussed the fact that a significant number of part-time workers suggested under-utilization of the labor force. A combination of stronger labor markets and a 0.25 percent reduction of mortgage rates during the intermeeting period between September 17 and October 28 were seen as positive for housing markets, but the committee noted that mortgage lending standards for single-family homes had not changed much. Lending requirements were more accommodative for commercial real estate.

QE Ends, FOMC Seeks to Maintain “Accommodative” Financial Conditions

FOMC members voted to end asset purchases made under the Fed’s quantitative easing program, but said that ongoing reinvestment of principal payments on bonds and MBS with the goal of maintaining “sizeable” holdings of long-term securities. The minutes indicated that this would help maintain “accommodative” financial conditions.

The committee agreed to re-assert its position that although national unemployment and inflation may achieve or surpass FOMC goals, the committee could maintain the target federal funds rate at current levels for “some time” after the benchmarks are achieved. Ultimately, the FOMC’s decision to change the target federal funds rate will include thorough and ongoing review of global and domestic economic developments.

Committee members concluded this meeting with a decision to set the next FOMC meeting for December 16 and 17.

Three Key Tips to Help Ensure Your Mortgage Pre-Approval Isn’t Declined

Three Key Tips to Help Ensure Your Mortgage Pre-Approval Isn't DeclinedIf you’re thinking about buying a new home and using a mortgage to help cover some of the purchase costs, it’s a good idea to get an initial pre-approval from your lender before putting in an offer.

In today’s blog post we’ll share three quick tips that can help to ensure that your mortgage pre-approval isn’t declined.

Demonstrate Your Income and Good Credit

A mortgage is a major financial transaction and one that carries a certain amount of risk for the lender. It’s your goal to help them see that you have the ability to make your monthly payments and that there is very little risk in approving your mortgage. Be ready to demonstrate all of your sources of income and that your credit rating is clean.

It may be worth paying for your credit report before starting the pre-approval process so you can clean up any black marks or false reports and so that you can see what the lender will see when they check your credit history.

Choose the Right Property at the Right Price

As the home you’re buying will be used as collateral to back the mortgage, the lender will need to see that there is enough value in the home to cover the cost of the mortgage should you fail to pay it back. The “loan to value” or LTV ratio is the amount of your mortgage divided by the value of the home. For example, if you’re borrowing $150,000 to buy a home valued at $200,000, you’ll have a LTV ratio of 75 percent. Keep in mind that each lender will have their own target LTV that they prefer to work with, so you may need to shop around a bit.

Start the Process with Multiple Lenders

Finally, if you feel that your income or credit history isn’t perfect you may want to consider visiting a couple of different mortgage lenders to see what they can offer you. There are dozens of different mortgage products on the market today, and each lender has their own set of qualification criteria that they will use to assess risk and whether they feel that you can afford to pay the mortgage back. Getting a second opinion may help you to discover a more suitable mortgage or one with a better interest rate.

As you can see, there are a number of ways that you can work to ensure that your mortgage pre-approval passes without a hitch. For more information about pre-approvals and to get the process started, contact a local mortgage professional today. After you’re approved it’s only a matter of time before you’ll be moving in to your new home.

The Down Payment: Everything You Need to Know About Your Down Payment on a New Home

The Down Payment: Everything You Need to Know About Your Down Payment on a New HomeWhether you’re just starting to shop for a new home or you’ve found the perfect house and are crafting your offer, if you’re taking out a mortgage to help cover your real estate purchase you’ve likely given some thought to your down payment.

In today’s blog post we’ll explore the topic of down payments and share how the amount you put down on your home will affect your mortgage.

How Your Down Payment Affects Your Mortgage

As you know, your mortgage is essentially a large long-term loan that is paid back with interest over a set time period. If you put a large down payment against the purchase, you will not only reduce the amount that you’ll need to pay back, but you’ll also reduce the lender’s risk and this may allow them to provide you with lower interest rates.

Conversely, if you can’t place very much down on your home and you’re left borrowing as much as you can you may find that your mortgage comes with higher interest rates or that some mortgage lenders refuse your business entirely.

The Gold Standard: 20% of the Purchase Price

For the vast majority of homeowners it’s expected that they will be able to contribute at least 20 percent of the home’s purchase price. For example, if you are buying a $200,000 house you’ll need to have at least $40,000 available for your down payment. Note that the 20 percent figure isn’t a hard requirement; some mortgage lenders will be willing to approve you with less, but you may be subject to private mortgage insurance, higher interest rates and more.

Saving Up Your Down Payment

Depending on your financial situation and the cost of your home you may find that saving up 20 percent of the purchase price to put toward a down payment places a strain on your finances. If you still have a year or more before you’re ready to jump into the real estate market, consider putting some money aside each month that can be used for a down payment. If you receive any lump sum payments like a tax return, save this in your down payment fund as well.

As you can see, your down payment is one of the more important considerations you’ll have to make when buying your home with a mortgage. If you have questions about mortgages or down payments, be sure to call your local mortgage professional today as they’ll be able to share their guidance and expertise to help you make the best financial decision.

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